Crooked Nose Surgery

A Procedure for Symmetry and Balance in the New York Area

People often place a high value on a slender, attractive, and well-formed nose. Being the anchor feature of the human face, it’s one of the first things we notice when we meet someone. If a person’s nose is bent or crooked, that can leave a lasting negative impression, which is a prime reason men and women seek crooked nose surgery at the New York area’s Williams Center for Plastic Surgery.

To request a consultation in the New York area, contact the Williams Center for Plastic Surgery online or by phone at 1-800-742-2797.

Not everyone is born with excellent nasal form and symmetry. Some people have congenital nasal deficits and irregularities that can make the nose appear crooked and out of balance with the rest of the face. Others notice that they have developed a crooked nose as a direct result of an injury or trauma. In some cases, the trauma produced a nasal obstruction causing an abnormal breathing pattern. Septorhinoplasty is the procedure used to correct many nasal irregularities, including a bent or crooked nose. Rhinoplasty surgery is a common choice, though nonsurgical options are also available.

You can be confident you'll be in good hands with double-board certified facial plastic surgeon Dr. Edwin Williams:

  • 25 years of experience and counting! Learn More!
  • A respected national educator on advanced rhinoplasty.
  • An expert in closed rhinoplasty techniques.
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To request a consultation for crooked nose surgery in the New York area, contact the Williams Center for Plastic Surgery online or by phone at 1-800-742-2797.

The Crooked Nose Fix Is In

Noses that are congenitally crooked or bent, or have been damaged by a hard blow, require a skilled surgeon to repair the defect or damage. In the absence of a nasal bone fracture, septorhinoplasty can restore the nose to its normal shape, or improve the shape of a congenitally irregular (crooked) nose. Surgery involves making the necessary repairs through the use of harvested cartilage grafts or spreader grafts in order to rebuild the nose to a more midline position.

In cases involving major nasal deformities, from birth or trauma, crooked nose surgery is perhaps the best method to correct the problem.

Do You Prefer a Non-Surgical Method to Crooked Nose Surgery?

In minor cases of nasal twisting, whether congenital or traumatic in nature, the surgeon may recommend a non-surgical fix using an injectable filler such as Silikon-1000 to achieve results.

Fixing a Crooked Nose: Surgery vs. Fillers

Injectable fillers are used to correct minor deformities, provided there is no serious nasal obstruction, nasal bone fracture, or a significantly crooked nose. Surgery is recommended for more involved cases. As long as the nasal bones are intact and undamaged—and straight—the surgeon will most likely recommend the harvesting of septal cartilage and spreader graft placement as the most common and effective ways to straighten the midsection of the nose.

It basically comes down to the nature and degree of the nasal irregularity to determine the right course of action, whether it’s corrective surgery or an alternative, non-invasive method. Choosing the best surgeon—one who is board certified and has many years of experience performing a variety of rhinoplasty procedures—is a key to getting the results you want from crooked nose surgery or any treatment or procedure.

Why Choose Dr. Williams for Crooked Nose Surgery?

Dr. Edwin F. Williams is certified by the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and the American Board of Otolaryngology. He is also a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, and the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery. Dr Williams is passionate about rhinoplasty—even revision rhinoplasties. He recently published a book:
Rhinoplasty—Everything You Need to Know About Fixing and Re-Shaping Your Nose.

Crooked Nose FAQs

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Where Are the Incisions in Crooked Nose Surgery?

The incisions for crooked nose rhinoplasty vary depending on the surgeon and the procedure he or she prefers. There are basically two different approaches used, broadly categorized as either the open approach or the closed approach. In this case, a closed approach is often referred to as an endonasal or scarless crooked nose rhinoplasty, since there are no incisions on the outside of the nose.

Some surgeons see an advantage of the open approach, as they believe they can see things better and thereby more precisely perform crooked nose surgery. However, a skilled and experienced surgeon such as Dr. Williams likely prefers the endonasal or closed approach when correcting a crooked nose, as it leaves less scarring, is more comfortable for the patient, and takes less healing time. Also, the closed approach offers more predictable outcomes in crooked nose surgery.

The endonasal approach requires surgeons to navigate a steep learning curve, as it involves a more complex execution. Before focusing on this technique, for the first 10 years of his career, Dr. Williams performed most of his procedures using the open approach. This approach gave him the experience needed to now perform endonasal surgery almost exclusively.

The crooked nose procedure is covered in more detail in the doctor’s Famous Fireside Chats series titled The Great Debate: Open vs. Closed Rhinoplasty.

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Do You Pack the Nose after Crooked Nose Surgery?

While many surgeons still pack the nose after crooked nose surgery, Dr. Williams, who primarily uses the endonasal or scarless approach, feels the need for such packing is overrated and unnecessary.

Some surgeons still use heavy packing, believing it holds the nose in position after crooked nose surgery. In Dr. Williams’ extensive experience, if the nose is not exactly in position after a well-performed rhinoplasty, heavy packing will not hold it in position. Instead, Dr. Williams uses a limited amount of dressing in each nostril (like a very light tampon), which can be removed the day after surgery.

This is significant, as many patients feel the packing is the most uncomfortable aspect of crooked nose surgery. Once the outer splint is removed, approximately one week after crooked nose surgery, Dr. Williams advises patients to avoid any work or other activity that could strike the nose for up to two weeks.

In Dr. Williams’ Famous Fireside Chats video, he demonstrates how the nose is dressed and the splint removed (one week post op) after crooked nose surgery.

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Will Crooked Nose Surgery Fix Breathing Problems?

Many patients have difficulty breathing caused by a twisted or crooked nose, a deviated septum, or incompetent nasal valves, which collapse during normal breathing due to narrowing of the valve area, a loss of upper and/or lower lateral cartilage support, or a combination of these.

Patients with this issue should have nose evaluated by a competent surgeon so it can be addressed during a cosmetic rhinoplasty.

This and many other questions are answered in Dr. Williams’ Famous Fireside Chats on correcting and fixing breathing during a crooked nose surgery.

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The Cost of Crooked Nose Surgery

The cost of crooked nose rhinoplasty depends on several factors. First and foremost is whether the patient is undergoing a first time (primary) crooked nose rhinoplasty or a revision (second or third) surgery.

When a patient has had an unfavorable result with crooked nose surgery and seeks a second or third surgery, it is considered more difficult and requires a more experienced surgeon. This affects the cost of crooked nose surgery, as the latter procedure is more complicated and takes more time.

Another factor affecting the cost of crooked nose surgery concerns the practice’s geographic location. Naturally, given the same level of skill and experience, a surgeon operating in Manhattan is likely to charge more then a surgeon in a small city due to difference in the cost of living and of doing business.

Third and last, a more experienced surgeon performing crooked nose surgery typically charges more than a less experienced surgeon. This is to be expected given more experience increases the likelihood of achieving a satisfactory or more desirable outcome in a crooked nose procedure.

The cost of crooked nose surgery ranges from $7,000 to $14,000, depending on several factors, including operating room fees and anesthesia. Refer to Dr. Williams’ Famous Fireside Chats for more information on fees and other considerations regarding crooked nose surgery.

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Contact Lenses or Glasses Following Crooked Nose Surgery

After rhinoplasty correcting a crooked nose, a splint or cast may be placed on the outside of the nose. For this reason, patients may find it hard to wear their glasses. This can be addressed by wrapping a small piece of tape to the middle of the glasses and hanging them from the forehead.

When it comes to contact lenses, we suggest patients do not wear lenses for one week. After that time, and once the splint is removed, our patients can start wearing them again.

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How is Computerized Imaging Used in Crooked Nose Surgery?

In crooked nose surgery, the patient’s images are taken digitally and customized by the surgeon to show the patient potential outcomes.

Dr. Williams, who has used CGI (computer generated imaging) in crooked nose surgery for 25 years, finds it extremely valuable in showing the patient how he will correct the issue.

Our book, Rhinoplasty: Everything You Need to Know about Fixing and Reshaping Your Nose includes FAQs regarding surgery correcting a crooked nose. These are also addressed in his Rhinoplasty Fireside Chats YouTube series.

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Complications and Risks of Crooked Nose Surgery

Most experienced and reputable surgeons will discuss potential complications and risks following surgery correcting a crooked nose.

It is very rare to have complications from a crooked nose surgery that is executed well in the hands of an experienced rhinoplasty surgeon. There is always the possibility for some bleeding or infection, but these complications are rare in crooked nose surgery.

One risk commonly discussed with the patient seeking this crooked nose procedure is the possible need for revision or touch-up surgery. In doing your research, you will find that approximately five to 10 percent of crooked nose surgery patients request or need a touch-up type of procedure. In the hands of an experienced surgeon, this percentage is probably considerably lower, and the need for a touch-up type procedure is typically minor in the case of crooked nose surgery and often performed in the office.

While most experienced rhinoplasty surgeons are perfectionists, even in the most experienced hands crooked nose surgery is not a perfect procedure, as surgeons are blending their talents, skills, and individual anatomic variances of a patient toward the goal of an ideal outcome.

The most likely complication in crooked nose surgery is an unhappy patient, whose expectations have not been met. This can almost completely be avoided by clear communication between the patient and the surgeon in a lengthy and detailed consultation. During the consultation, most reputable surgeons will not only explain to the patient what they can do, but will also explain what they feel the crooked nose surgery can’t achieve.

Questions about crooked nose surgery are answered in Dr. Williams’ Famous Fireside Chats regarding complications following rhinoplasty.

+

Anesthesia in Crooked Nose Rhinoplasty

Administered by a separate and credentialed anesthesia provider, outpatient anesthesia is usually used and allows the patients to go home the same day.

However, twilight or general anesthesia may also be used, depending on the preference of the patient and surgeon. Most patients prefer to be asleep, and most surgeons find that preferential for their patients as well.

Crooked nose surgery is explained further in Dr. Williams’ Famous Fireside Chat on anesthesia for rhinoplasty.

            Where Are the Incisions in Crooked Nose Surgery?

The incisions for crooked nose rhinoplasty vary depending on the surgeon and the procedure he or she prefers. There are basically two different approaches used, broadly categorized as either the open approach or the closed approach. In this case, a closed approach is often referred to as an endonasal or scarless crooked nose rhinoplasty, since there are no incisions on the outside of the nose.

Some surgeons see an advantage of the open approach, as they believe they can see things better and thereby more precisely perform crooked nose surgery. However, a skilled and experienced surgeon such as Dr. Williams likely prefers the endonasal or closed approach when correcting a crooked nose, as it leaves less scarring, is more comfortable for the patient, and takes less healing time. Also, the closed approach offers more predictable outcomes in crooked nose surgery.

The endonasal approach requires surgeons to navigate a steep learning curve, as it involves a more complex execution. Before focusing on this technique, for the first 10 years of his career, Dr. Williams performed most of his procedures using the open approach. This approach gave him the experience needed to now perform endonasal surgery almost exclusively.

The crooked nose procedure is covered in more detail in the doctor’s Famous Fireside Chats series titled The Great Debate: Open vs. Closed Rhinoplasty.

            Do You Pack the Nose after Crooked Nose Surgery?

While many surgeons still pack the nose after crooked nose surgery, Dr. Williams, who primarily uses the endonasal or scarless approach, feels the need for such packing is overrated and unnecessary.

Some surgeons still use heavy packing, believing it holds the nose in position after crooked nose surgery. In Dr. Williams’ extensive experience, if the nose is not exactly in position after a well-performed rhinoplasty, heavy packing will not hold it in position. Instead, Dr. Williams uses a limited amount of dressing in each nostril (like a very light tampon), which can be removed the day after surgery.

This is significant, as many patients feel the packing is the most uncomfortable aspect of crooked nose surgery. Once the outer splint is removed, approximately one week after crooked nose surgery, Dr. Williams advises patients to avoid any work or other activity that could strike the nose for up to two weeks.

In Dr. Williams’ Famous Fireside Chats video, he demonstrates how the nose is dressed and the splint removed (one week post op) after crooked nose surgery.

            Will Crooked Nose Surgery Fix Breathing Problems?

Many patients have difficulty breathing caused by a twisted or crooked nose, a deviated septum, or incompetent nasal valves, which collapse during normal breathing due to narrowing of the valve area, a loss of upper and/or lower lateral cartilage support, or a combination of these.

Patients with this issue should have nose evaluated by a competent surgeon so it can be addressed during a cosmetic rhinoplasty.

This and many other questions are answered in Dr. Williams’ Famous Fireside Chats on correcting and fixing breathing during a crooked nose surgery.

            The Cost of Crooked Nose Surgery

The cost of crooked nose rhinoplasty depends on several factors. First and foremost is whether the patient is undergoing a first time (primary) crooked nose rhinoplasty or a revision (second or third) surgery.

When a patient has had an unfavorable result with crooked nose surgery and seeks a second or third surgery, it is considered more difficult and requires a more experienced surgeon. This affects the cost of crooked nose surgery, as the latter procedure is more complicated and takes more time.

Another factor affecting the cost of crooked nose surgery concerns the practice’s geographic location. Naturally, given the same level of skill and experience, a surgeon operating in Manhattan is likely to charge more then a surgeon in a small city due to difference in the cost of living and of doing business.

Third and last, a more experienced surgeon performing crooked nose surgery typically charges more than a less experienced surgeon. This is to be expected given more experience increases the likelihood of achieving a satisfactory or more desirable outcome in a crooked nose procedure.

The cost of crooked nose surgery ranges from $7,000 to $14,000, depending on several factors, including operating room fees and anesthesia. Refer to Dr. Williams’ Famous Fireside Chats for more information on fees and other considerations regarding crooked nose surgery.

            Contact Lenses or Glasses Following Crooked Nose Surgery

After rhinoplasty correcting a crooked nose, a splint or cast may be placed on the outside of the nose. For this reason, patients may find it hard to wear their glasses. This can be addressed by wrapping a small piece of tape to the middle of the glasses and hanging them from the forehead.

When it comes to contact lenses, we suggest patients do not wear lenses for one week. After that time, and once the splint is removed, our patients can start wearing them again.

            How is Computerized Imaging Used in Crooked Nose Surgery?

In crooked nose surgery, the patient’s images are taken digitally and customized by the surgeon to show the patient potential outcomes.

Dr. Williams, who has used CGI (computer generated imaging) in crooked nose surgery for 25 years, finds it extremely valuable in showing the patient how he will correct the issue.

Our book, Rhinoplasty: Everything You Need to Know about Fixing and Reshaping Your Nose includes FAQs regarding surgery correcting a crooked nose. These are also addressed in his Rhinoplasty Fireside Chats YouTube series.

            Complications and Risks of Crooked Nose Surgery

Most experienced and reputable surgeons will discuss potential complications and risks following surgery correcting a crooked nose.

It is very rare to have complications from a crooked nose surgery that is executed well in the hands of an experienced rhinoplasty surgeon. There is always the possibility for some bleeding or infection, but these complications are rare in crooked nose surgery.

One risk commonly discussed with the patient seeking this crooked nose procedure is the possible need for revision or touch-up surgery. In doing your research, you will find that approximately five to 10 percent of crooked nose surgery patients request or need a touch-up type of procedure. In the hands of an experienced surgeon, this percentage is probably considerably lower, and the need for a touch-up type procedure is typically minor in the case of crooked nose surgery and often performed in the office.

While most experienced rhinoplasty surgeons are perfectionists, even in the most experienced hands crooked nose surgery is not a perfect procedure, as surgeons are blending their talents, skills, and individual anatomic variances of a patient toward the goal of an ideal outcome.

The most likely complication in crooked nose surgery is an unhappy patient, whose expectations have not been met. This can almost completely be avoided by clear communication between the patient and the surgeon in a lengthy and detailed consultation. During the consultation, most reputable surgeons will not only explain to the patient what they can do, but will also explain what they feel the crooked nose surgery can’t achieve.

Questions about crooked nose surgery are answered in Dr. Williams’ Famous Fireside Chats regarding complications following rhinoplasty.

            Anesthesia in Crooked Nose Rhinoplasty

Administered by a separate and credentialed anesthesia provider, outpatient anesthesia is usually used and allows the patients to go home the same day.

However, twilight or general anesthesia may also be used, depending on the preference of the patient and surgeon. Most patients prefer to be asleep, and most surgeons find that preferential for their patients as well.

Crooked nose surgery is explained further in Dr. Williams’ Famous Fireside Chat on anesthesia for rhinoplasty.

If you’re considering a cosmetic procedure such as crooked nose surgery and want to consult with an experienced New York-area facial plastic surgeon, call the Williams Center at 1-800-742-2797 today!

To request a consultation in the New York area, contact the Williams Center for Plastic Surgery online or by phone at 1-800-742-2797.

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